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20121223
20121223
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
japan, for what they have done. if you read the papers recently, you know, that japan suffered a very harsh earthquake and tsunami a while back. and they could have easily said, that we are victims of a national disaster. but, when the country heard that the debris was crossing international lines, all the way to the west coast, and they did not claim victim. they also said, we could help. and that is why we heard the news of japan donating $5 million to help the west coast also deal with the debris. that is a wonderful, wonderful gesture of humanitarian work. and so it is my honor tonight, that i stand here with council general inamata welcoming him and the symbol of his country and knowing the origins of the origami and knowing that we have his blessing and his country's blessing, and working with us to make the world better. and create more peace to create tolerance and acceptance for everyone and that this will always improve the quality of life for everyone on this planet. and so, it is with that, that i welcome mr. inamata and the council general of japan here to say a few words
and the earthquake and tsunami in japan and last year, and during hurricane katrina we tributed one mill object pounds of food aid. [ applause ] >> and all of that is coming from the lgbt and friends community. so we work as ambassadors for our community and we help change people's minds and hearts about who we are and what we care about. besides providing humanitarian aid, we try to inspire hope in all of our projects and we have found that hope is really just as important as aid, if not more so. and we have worked with a lot of communities in desperate situations arounded world and we found that providing a little bit of humanitarian aid and a lot of courage and hope it is amazing that people in desperate circumstances can do to improve theirs life. so seven years ago we really have a feeling that in the united states, we really need to increase our hope also. and we decided to do that by creating a global art project, the world, tree of hope. and what you see behind you is a live, 23-foot christmas tree and it is covered with 10,000 pieces of oragami and most of it is white cranes and all of
. >> as you can see the garden has a wide variety of plants here, almost a hundred species from japan and china and bamboo and native plants. >> they're trimmed to a human scale so you relate to them on a human level. >> this is one of my favorite sections and you can see the goarnlrous maples by the bamboo back drop and especially beautiful in the fall when the leaves start changing colors. just around the corner from maple lane this little garden is called a zen garden, a dry landscape garden and constructed here in 1953. this was originally designed by zen monks for the ground. their main purpose was to create a trairchg tranquil setting for the monks. this is no ordinary bridge. it's made of redwood, oak and cedar. the high arch style makes it easy to pass under. the newly refurbished tea house is in the center of the gard scpen a great place to eat and chill as you take in the view of the garden. if you wish you can experience the rich cultural tradition that celebrates the preparation of green tea or matcha and your host dressed in the ceremony will demonstrate how to clea
and japan and germany and basically assure the renewable energy community there is a guaranteed off taker and price paid for electricity generated from a renewable energy project. it's normally 10 or 20 years and set higher than the going rate for gas or electricity generation so it provides a sole developer to say i have this contract for this off taker whether the caa or whoever toy bathe power and. >> >> and guaranteed to buy it from me and i can go to the bank i have this stream of income if you give me a loan. >> please continue. >> thanks, so one of the areas -- also that is applicable to efficiency is addressing barriers for 10 -- tenants and may be are tenants in their spaces and critical to reduce this for efficiency and new due to incentives or they don't have access to physical resources like their roof so expanding energy to renewable energy is one opportunity that would help the renewable energy space. right now all ratepayers pay into -- for example the state fund that goes towards the solar incentive but across the state only a quarter of houses can take advantage of on the
. >> normally is different because of oil. >> i think sweden and germany -- >> in japan. i'd be careful about drawing too much for japan. i think that sweden, denmark and germany are really interesting and what they've done with the deal between labor and capital and also frankly across society. the german reaction to the recession was sensitive laypeople of, everybody would effectively take a pay cut of 30%. it takes a lot of social unity to have that. having said that, i think it's going to take more than going to the social democracy of northern europe because you're feeling tensions also in northern european countries and you'd be surprised at the extent to which this whole discourse we are having could have the same discussion in berlin and particularly in berlin but the germans are realizing this in a way they didn't hollow at the middle class. they did the rest of your. they are the china of the e.u. that's one way to do it. the only other thing i might say, which is funny and the reaction i liked in my book, senior european goldman sachs guy who i quoted my book sent me an e-mail sayi
in western europe or japan? the reason is diversity of our capital markets. so bain capital go win, turnaround companies come and get good returns to pension funds for customers. public pension funds are the biggest in company pension funds and nonprofits like universities come individuals way back. so is our ability to get these, sufficient capital markets that enable us to get 50% of her time higher growth rates in europe. seelig hit europe. i do want to bore your viewers with them members but american banks lend american companies rate now about $1.4 trillion from europe that number is 6 trillion, even though the european economies as a whole are about the same size as the u.s. which you call bonded debt, or come in a skit involved in commercial paper, bonds and other sources. five chilliness country, only one in europe. that means europe is top-heavy with banks. but that means is if you're a small company and you start to grow, you don't have the capital industry we have. you don't have the diverse sources of capital here. sue eventually give forest to become part of a big comp
, including canada, germany, great britain, japan, france-- why are their gun deaths so much lower than ourselves? i mean, john howard, a very conservative prime minister-- former prime minister of australia said we don't want the american disease in australia. why is it that all these other countries don't seem to have this problem? >> well, they have soo they have a homicide problem. they have a violent crime problem. in britain, it's four times what ours is. they don't have as many guns. that doesn't prevent killing. it doesn't prevent mayhem. it doesn't prevent violent crime. >> schieffer: you don't really believe people armed with baseball pats batcan somehow kill more people than people armed with guns. >> in this country, more people are beaten to death than are killed by long guns. >> schieffer: the people who are surviving gunshot wounds now, it's because we have better medical help, david, for the same reason-- >> that's good. >> schieffer: yes, it's good. it's the same reason more of our people are surviving on the battlefields, but that's not the end of it. why do you-- why
, that sand or land fill, acts like water. this is sand, sand and water coming up through a hole. in japan, all these buildings were built on liquefaction. i forget what year this was, but it was one of the bigger earthquakes. 7 story buildings built on liquefaction. the amount of time the earth shook, the earth became liquid and as it became liquid, the building sank into it until it stopped. when it stopped it just fell over. light damage buildings, superficial damage, broken windows, some plaster that might be cracked but basically a light damage building would be one that has mostly damage to the contents. shelves falling over, windows broken, that type of thing. if you had to go into a light damaged building, you would use these procedures. of course you gather information about a building before you go into it, as much information, who lives there, that type of thing. shut off any utilities needed, locate and triage any injured patients, document and communicate the location of any trapped or missing persons. it could be an invalid. in fact, most of the injuries apld most of the deat
will grow faster. while the median age in mexico will be 30, 40, japan's median age will hit 52. america actually has an advantage here at 39. our median age will only be five years older than that of mexico's. trends don't ensure particular outcome, but it's clear that contrary to its global image, mexico's economy has momentum. it will be among the world's top ten economies by the end of this decade. smart reforms can build it further. the irony is that one possible impediment to mexico's growth could be the very country that is its biggest asset, the united states. if we slow down, so will mexico. but perhaps that can be avoided if washington's polarized factions could agree on a way forward. maybe we need to take some lessons from south of the border. up next, the inside story on a tough controversial decision. why the obama administration bailed out the auto industry. i'll speak with steve rapner, the president's lead adviser on the bailout. welcome to chevy's year-end event. so, the 5.3-liter v8 silverado can tow up to 9,600 pounds? 315 horsepower. what's that in reindeer-power? [
truman's decision to use abatomic bomb against japan. tonight, we'll examine the process of making a tough decision. we'll hear about major decisions on an international stage. about corporate decisions to personal ones. from taking down the most wanted man in the world. >> the president said i'm going to go with my decision. write up the orders .. >> to giving up a dream career. >> it was a sense of lm unreality, i'm not really sure i know who i am. >> to uprooting a company culture. >> some people actually quit. >> to opening the door to a closed society. >> this is like a spy thriller. >> each of my guests have wrestled with a difficult choice. they'll take us through their deliberations, their fears and how they made their tough decisions. >> at 11:00 a.m. on may 1, 2011, two black hawk helicopters, 23 naycy sales, a translator and a dog named cairo took off from afghanistan. the mission -- to kill the world's most wanted made, osama bin laden. >> the death of bin laden marks the most significant achievement to date in an effort to defeat al qaeda. >> most have heard the incred
. >> the world wants to buy u.s. food. shipping to japan, korea. taiwan. we have to increase the made in usa symbols. >> for a world with a sweet tooth, too good gourmet. a little sugar. spice. flour. and a boss who works the way some of us eat cookies, she never stops. >> you can't help yourself, are can you? >> i can't, to. >> and the cookies keep coming. wayne freedman, abc 7 news. >>> well, it it is more than soggy out there and our meteorologist lisa has been over at the weather center trying to make sure you got all of the last minute details. >> that's right. a flood watch up in sonoma and a flash flood warning through 12:45 also up in sonoma county around petaluma, sonoma valley and creek looking at some of the streams. flooding right now. a look at mount tamed cam with wind gusts of 50 miles an hour at the coast. another couple of hours of heavy rain. andntial flooding tapped thunderstorms this afternoon. your forecast coming up. >>> the little glow fish that could hold the key to discovering life s >> lisa just cited a litany of weather woes from wind advisories to flooding. what e
. shipping to japan, korea, taiwan. we have to increase the made in usa symbol. >> so with the world a with sweet tooth. here's the saving grace. too good gourmet, a little sugar, spice, a little flour, and a boss that works the way some of us eat cookies, she never stops. >> all right. you can't help yourself, can you? >> i can't, no. >> and the cookies keep coming. in san lorenzo, abc7 news. >> another day, another storm. >> yes, deja vu, right? well, you were here yesterday. we are looking at some pretty heavy rain south of san francisco and north of san francisco. wind advisories throughout the bay area. heavy rain pushing into the peninsula and also in the north bay. we will track it for you and tell you how long it's going to keep a soggy mess coming up. >> thank you, lisa. also ahead the little glow fish from the researchers say could hold the key to discovering life-saving drug >> meteorologist lisa argen is here now. >> we are looking south of san francisco on the peninsula getting pretty good rain right now. we want to start in the sierra nevada where a winter storm warning
to buy us food. shipping to japan, korea, taiwan. we have to increase the made in usa symbol. >> so with the world a with sweet tooth. here's the saving grace. too good gourmet, a little sugar, spice, a little flour, and a boss that works the way some of us eat cookies, she never stops. >> all right. you can't help yourself, can you? >> i can't, no. >> and the cookies keep coming. in san lorenzo, abc7 news. >> well, here we go again. we continue to feel this rain. >> yes. this is a pretty strong system. you will see it localize. heavy rain causing flooding this morning as the wind and rain increases. a look at the south bay. 52 degrees in san jose. we are looking at wind gusts over 25 miles an hour. so we will talk about how long parts of the south bay will see the rain. it will end last in your neighborhood and the rest of the bay we've got moderate rain in the north bay. the full forecast next. >> also ahead, the little glow fish that ucf researchers say could hold the key to [ female announcer ] style is long lasting when hair is nourished that's why new dove style + care frizz f
of regeneration in hawaii, his father emigrating from japan, at a time when there was strong in real prejudice that still existed in america -- a man who came of age as the secondary war burst upon the scene, and that very prejudiced against japanese-americans reached a crescendo. december 7, 1942, as the majority leader has alluded to, on the way to mass or on the way to church with your grandfather, listening to the radio about the bombing that was taking place in pearl harbor, and as danny told the story, over several times, at least i heard it, he thought it was an orson welles kind of thing. he and his father drove, looking at the horizon, and could see pearl harbor, the bombs bursting. he was then labeled an enemy alien. he was labeled an enemy aliens, as his family was, because of his japanese ancestry. but he fought. he fought for the chance to fight for his country. he had to fight for the chance to fight for his country, not just to prove that he was a loyal american, but because he knew, he knew what was at stake, because it was the right thing to do. my mom, as i was telling my col
and japan is a 4. let's compare the satisfaction to the average marginal tax rates people pay in those countries. americans pay on average $41.7% when you factor in federal, state and local taxes, but the dans pay more, 48.1%. and so how come these guys are happier? danish taxes pay for pok post-secondary education. canadas taxes pay for universal health care. the french pay fewer taxes than americans do and are less happy. only the japanese actually make sense, they pay higher taxes, 47.2% and they are less satisfied with what they end up with. fareed zakaria is the host of cnn's fareed zakaria gps and has a special on sunday at 8:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. entitled "tough decisions." i asked him are american taxpayers getting their money's worth. >> imagine a guy in germany, probably he pays particularly if he's upper middle class or upper class, he probably pays more in total taxes than his american counterpart. though it's not entirely clear once you add value-added consumption tax, for sure he's paying more. but here's what he gets in return. he gets universal health care, high-qualit
with the video games but other western industrialized countries have those problems and have video culture. japan is at the cutting edge and don't allow access to military assault-style -- this is not about freedom but tyranny and destruction. >> this is what frustrates -- [ all talking at one ] >> the mental illness argument has been used to evade action. more guns and bullets, more dead children. we must, must regulate guns and i do think it's a tipping point moment. not just "the daily news" and "the new york post" but you're seeing pro-nra senators like senator manchin, senator warner, governor hickenlooper in colorado, others saying we must move, speed is of the essence. >> senator manchin said we have to consider everything. let me give grover a chance to respond to some of this now. >> look, the national rifle association represents a great number of americans and 20% will tell you in polls that they belong to the nra, and so one is a very important issue, one, we should support the first amendment, as well as the second amendment. i'm not sure -- some people's suggestions of censorship wo
in asia between china and japan and the south china sea and the united states. >> let's switch gears now and talk about senator kerry, who will likely be secretary of state coming up. and with regard to the israeli/palestinian situation, do you think he might have an approach that could come and get something palpable done over there? >> i think that's really a presidential call. when you're dealing with israeli/palestinian issue, it's the president of the united states who's going to make that call. and really in all foreign policy it is the president's prerogative. i think what you're going to see in senator kerry is a very, very effective secretary of state who's a great member of the team. he brings a lot of experience. he brings a lot of passion, a lot of personal knowledge, and background to these issues. so i think he'll be very, very helpful as an adviser to the president. i think he'll be a great spokesman for united states in his missions abroad and a great mediator in those particular issues. but he is a member of the president's team and the president's in charge. >> based on
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)